May Displays

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Find your next favorite book! Come view our library displays for the month of May:

Asian American Heritage (1st FL)
Stop by this display by the McKillop Cafe to find a book celebrating the heritage of Asian Americans in the U.S. For more on Asian Pacific Heritage, visit https://asianpacificheritage.gov/

Display by Nancy Barta-Norton, Acquisitions and Cataloging Librarian

Mental Health Awareness (1st FL)

In addition to books and DVDs the display also provides some handouts on where to get help, a wellness checklist and more. Also see our topic guide at https://salve.libguides.com/MHAM and blog post at https://library.salvereginablogs.com/library-display-mental-health-awareness/ for additional statistics, videos, book recommendations and resources.

Display by Lori Barile, Systems & Technology Librarian

Graphic Novels (1st FL)

Colorful, fun to read and amazingly profound, funny and informative, graphic novels are a unique way to read about any number of topics.

Display by Lori Barile, Systems & Technology Librarian

Opre Roma! (Roma Rising!) (1st FL)

The Romani people have faced persecution, discrimination, and in the past, even slavery. Explore this online guide of resources, e-books, and films to stream, or stop by the library to see the display.

Display by Gretchen Sotomayor, Special Programs and Instruction Librarian

Full Flower Moon (2nd FL)

May is the month of the Full Flower Moon, the biggest and brightest full moon of the year. The name “Flower Moon” has been attributed to the Algonquin peoples.

Display by Lisa Kenyon, Education and Instruction Librarian

The Supreme Court (1stFL)

Explore the personalities and the history behind the institution of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Display by Dawn Emsellem-Wichowski, Director of Library Services, and Nancy Barta-Norton, Acquisitions and Cataloging Librarian

Archives Display: “Spatial Relations” (3rd FL)

“Spatial Relations” is a mini exhibit of cartographic materials from Archives and Special Collections. It demonstrates a variety of representations of geographic space on paper and meditates on the role of map-making in empire, environment, and international relations. It also explores maps as covetable objects, highlighting the problems of map prints being removed from antiquarian books. The display is on the third floor of the library, between the stairs and the elevator, and will be available for viewing all semester during library hours.

Display by Genna Duplisea, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

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