January is Poverty in America Awareness Month

Photo by SamPac: http://www.flickr.com/photos/68593573@N00/322639083/

January is Poverty in America Awareness Month, sponsored by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.  According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 46.2 million people live below the official poverty line, the highest number in the 52 years these statistics have been collected.  Median income fell across all working-age groups, but young workers, ages 15-24, were hit hardest, with an income decline of 9%. 

McKillop Library has the books, articles, and statistical resources you need to help you understand this phenomenon.  Come check out our special display of books and DVDs about poverty on the 1st FL (and on your way in, stop and look at our poverty display case).

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According to a 2010 Washington Post/ Kaiser Family Foundation/ Harvard University poll, 64% of Americans believe that the government should do more to combat poverty.  17% believe the government should do less.

Source: library database “Polling the Nations” where researchers can find more public opinion data from the United States and around the world.

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300,000 to 400,000 youth might be expected to be homeless on any given day.

Source: Martha R. Burt, Ph.D. “Understanding Homeless Youth: Numbers, Characteristics, Multisystem Involvement, and Intervention Options” from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/901087_Burt_Homeless.pdf

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The number of people living in poverty in 2010 (46.2 million) is the largest number in the 52 years for which poverty estimates have been published.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Report: Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States: 2010 at: http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/2010/highlights.html

Also, see The Denver Post Blog for “Captured: Child Poverty in Colorado,” a project to document eight families living in poverty.
Photo by Lisa Underhill
Photo by Judy DeHaas, The Denver Post, used with permission
Photo by Judy DeHaas, The Denver Post, used with permission

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