Library Event: “An Interdisciplinary Approach to Empowering Survivors of Domestic Violence through Stress Reduction”

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An Interdisciplinary Approach to Empowering Survivors of Domestic Violence through Stress Reduction
Drs. Mary Montminy-Danna and Lisa Zuccarelli
Monday, October 31, 2016
4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
McKillop Library

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Drs. Mary Montminy-Danna and Lisa Zuccarelli’s pilot study of female survivors of intimate partner violence aimed to design an interdisciplinary model of stress reduction through the use of safe conversation, structured interviews and the use of a commercial biofeedback program. This approach is not typical of most domestic violence services, which usually provide counseling, advocacy and shelters. The opportunity to discuss with these women the amount and source of their stresses and their current coping mechanisms created an emotionally supportive environment for performing this study.

Biofeedback is used to train individuals to override the body’s stress responses, such as increased blood pressure and heart rate. Controlling these can result in restoring parasympathetic response, bringing calm to the body. By directing one’s mental activity through physical, visual and auditory stimulation, one can alter the potentially harmful physiological responses caused by chronic disturbances, such as pain, anxiety or other stressors. The autonomic system is controlled by hormones and neurotransmitters. Under chronic stress, humans over-secrete certain hormones, particularly cortisol, upsetting the body’s ability to maintain homeostasis. This can result in the shut-down of protective feedback mechanisms, creating altered metabolic states and a blunted immune response.

Salve Regina University, in line with its Mission, supports research that focuses on creating a world that is merciful, just and harmonious through its Antone Award for Academic Excellence: Special Project Award.

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Mary Montminy-Dana, Ph.D., associate professor of social work, receved her B.A. in political science, from University of Massachusetts Boston, her M.S. in counseling from Northeastern University and M.S.W from Boston University. Montminy-Dana completed her Ph.D. in social work at Boston College.

Lisa Zuccarelli, Ph.D., associate professor of biology and biomedical Sciences, received her B.A. in biology and chemistry from Albertus Magnus College, her M.S. in physiology and neurobiology from New York University, and her Ph.D. in biology from New York University.

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Library Event: “The Birth of Camouflage”

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“The Birth of Camouflage”
by Claudia Covert
Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014
4:00-5:00 p.m.
McKillop Library

Claudia Covert, readers’ services librarian at the Rhode Island School of Design will present a brief history of science, world events, technology and art that led to the birth of camouflage during World War I. Covert was instrumental in identifying and digitalizing RISD’s collection of dazzle ship plans.

In 2007, Covert’s article “Art at War: Dazzle Camouflage” was published in Art Documentation (v.26 #2). Covert was a keynote speaker at the University of Northern Iowa’s Envisioning Design Symposium and a panelist at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Museum for the “New Light on World War I Topics” Symposium. An interview with Claudia Covert was just published in Art New England Jan/Feb 2014 issue.

Claudia Covert currently chairs the Publication and Research committee of the Art Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries.

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“Conversas in Diaspora: The Second Inquisitorial trial of Isabel de Carvajal ” by Dr. Emily Colbert Cairns

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The Sephardic Diaspora in the Early Modern period saw transatlantic exchange of religious and cultural practices as well as economic activity. Conversos and Jewish families participated in a global trade network that connected Iberia, Europe, the New World, and Africa. Amidst this dynamic exchange women tactically used the private realm of the home to maintain and preserve rituals and faith practices. This lecture will focus on the material observance of crypto-Jew, Isabel de Carvajal, as described in her Inquisition manuscripts. Themes of religious hybridity will be discussed; Isabel publically acted as a Catholic and attended mass, but in her home secretly practiced Judaism. This mixed identity is one of the key features of converso identity. She and the rest of her family were brought up on judaizing trials in 1595-96 in New Spain, today Mexico, and ultimately burned at the stake in an auto-da-fe.

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Dr. Emily Colbert Cairns, a graduate of Hamilton College, received her M.A. and Ph.D in Spanish from the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on conversos and crypto-Jews in the Early Modern Period in the Spanish speaking world. She is an Assistant Professor of Spanish in the Salve Regina University Department of Modern and Classical Languages.

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